Short sea shipping and the potential of 45-foot containers in North Range-Baltic Sea region traffic

Port of Hamburg Marketing (HHM), with the help of the Bremen-headquartered Institute of Shipping Economics and Logistics (ISL), has finalised a study on the existing and future potential freight volumes handled by various short sea shipping companies in traffic to/from the Baltic Sea region (BSR) as well as has investigated the main challenges for a wider use of 45-foot long containers, all of this as HHM’s contribution to the TransBaltic Extension project.

After dealing with the first obstacle of estimating the share of shortsea-land traffic in the overall container volumes, something which is not distinguished in official statistics, the ISL found out that in 2012 the total containerised shortsea-land traffic between North Range ports and BSR amounted to approx. 1.1 mln TEU, with an additional 0.2 mln TEU within the Baltic area itself (roughly the same as in 2011). Long-distance short sea shipping services cut out the biggest share, e.g. North Range-Russia up to almost 0.6 mln TEU, followed by traffic to/from Sweden and Finland (each with around 0.15 mln TEU). The use of 45’ boxes oscillated in 2012 at nearly 0.5 mln TEU across the whole North Range-BSR container trades (89 thou. TEU in Baltic alone).

However, due to the impending 1st January 2015 stricter sulphur regulations regarding ships’ fuel (SECA), ISL forecasts a freight shift onto ferries (from which the Baltic short sea shipping already faces tough competition) or onto overland routes where a viable alternative can be set up. The 2020/2030 base outlook anticipates a drop by 10 percent in containerised shortsea volumes between 2012 and 2020 and more or less a recovery to 2012 figures no sooner that after another 10 years.

The study tables also a set of countermeasures. Firstly, the emission-based bonuses, when a 30 percent fuel cost reduction would not only offset the extra costs of SECA, but also increase the shortsea potential by 17-18 percent (around 235,000 TEU in 2030). Secondly, subsidising container handlings, where a EUR 10 subsidy on handling in EU ports would add some 7-8 percent (ca. 80,000 TEU in 2020 and 100,000 TEU a decade later). Thirdly, marketing efforts in the Baltic Sea economies could provide more backhaul cargo and balance imports and exports; this would minimize empty container runs, cut costs for the benefit of short sea shipping clients and thus tip the scale in favour of container shipments (50,000 TEU in 2030). Furthermore, motivating deep-sea carriers to accept short sea cargo on their feeder network would increase the sailings frequency to/from hub ports and might further increase volumes. And last but not least – customizing shippers’ facilities to make them more container-friendly, since many of them can only handle trailers due to loading ramps’ design. The study presents different countermeasures-implemented scenarios.

Additionally, the paper points out the most striking hindrances of a wider use of 45-footers. Some container terminals in North Range ports are fairly reluctant to see such units occupying space in their backyards (consuming the space of three 20’ boxes). Moreover, even if some shippers (e.g. from southern Germany) would like to take the advantage of a 45’, the rather limited supply of such boxes forces to have a pre-carriage of the box to the shipper, rendering the whole operation economically unattractive, giving standard boxes (or trucks) a privileged position.

 

Record result in seaborne cargo handling

gruppenfoto_0The Port of Hamburg continues record performance handling a total of 72.6 million to in the first 6 months of 2014. Hamburg’s universal port with 50.7 million tons of predominantly container handling achieves a result of 4.8 million TEU (20-ft standard containers), an increase of 6.8 percent. The largest seaports on the north European continent show an average growth in total handling of 1.8 percent and in container handling of 2.6 percent. The Port of Hamburg can look back on above average growth in container traffic, building up its market share from 25.7 to 26.7 percent.

At 51.6 million tons in the first half year general cargo handling showed a gain of 8.8 percent. “We can see extraordinarily strong growth in loaded container handling: 4.2 million full boxes went over the quay walls in Hamburg. That is 8.2 percent more than in the previous year and more than ever before in the port’s history in a first half-year,” explained Axel Mattern, member of the Executive Board of Port of Hamburg Marketing. At 588,000 TEU, handling empty boxes showed a slight decline of 2.1 percent. Strong exports with a total of 2.3 million TEU (+ 6.3 percent) in container handling, and comparably strong imports at 2.5 million TEU (+ 7.4 percent) are largely responsible for the generally above-average result in container handling.

Throughput in conventional general cargo also showed positive development with a plus at 930,000 tons (+ 0.8 percent) in the first half year, including 302,000 tons (+ 1.7 percent) in project and heavy lift cargo handling at the special terminals. This was possible thanks to strong growth in imports from 33.3 percent up to 66,000 tons. The bulk cargo sector with 21 million tons shows growth of 1.6 percent. This result was especially positively influenced by growing exports of grain, petroleum, biodiesel and chemical products. On the import side there was a slight decline of 4.5 percent in throughput of suction, grabbable and liquid cargo.

New jobs thanks to increased handling volumes

“The growth in seafreight has created new jobs in the Port of Hamburg. In the meantime there are more workers employed in the handling terminals than in the boom year 2008. The port economy is specifically seeking and employing more workers,” said Ingo Egloff, member of the Executive Board of Port of Hamburg Marketing. HHLA has just created 50 new jobs at Container Terminal Burchardkai at the end of July, and announced they would hire new employees at Container Terminal Altenwerder. The Personnel service provider for the port GHB (Gesamthafenbetriebsgesellschaft) has created 60 new jobs this year, in order to have enough qualified personnel for continued growth in general and bulk cargo terminals. “The Hamburg Port Authority is prepared for further growth and is increasing training places for the next generation, qualification programmes for career changers and continuous in-service training for employees. The port with its many varied professional requirements offers numerous attractive opportunities for those starting a career,” explained Egloff.

Delayed ships and construction sites have not hindered growth

Against a backdrop of considerable ship delays all the large container ports in the North Range are presented with considerable challenges, having to cope with the consequences. The delays, on average 70 hours and more in container shipping, especially for the larger containerships with between 6,000 and 7,000 containers (TEU) handled in each ship’s call, can very quickly lead to traffic problems at the port terminals. In addition the numerous construction sites in the Port and in the Hamburg area influence traffic flows at times. “We are especially pleased that in spite of these difficult conditions the Port of Hamburg can be competitive in the North Range and so successful, even gaining extra cargo volumes,” says Mattern.

Securing the Port of Hamburg’s reliability and quality is of special importance to Frank Horch, Hamburg’s Senator for economics, transport and innovation “It is our joint task to bring the transport chain in and through the Port of Hamburg back to the high level of reliability that made the port a preferred logistics service provider. Our investments in infrastructure are an absolute must. Today, those who make a case for less building, are putting the future of our location at risk,” emphasised Horch.

Heinrich Ahlers, CEO of Buss Port Logistics underlined that accessibility to Hamburg‘s universal port for heavy lifts is vital for many port companies and their employees: “Project cargo safeguards jobs for port service providers and multi-purpose terminals, such as our Buss Hansa Terminal. Hamburg policymakers must work together with the federal government and states to further maintain infrastructure, to avoid migration and the loss in value creation that would cause.”

From the point of view of Port of Hamburg Marketing it is clear that up to now, general good coordination of construction sites in the port and its main traffic axes have been greatly facilitating cargo traffic flows and contributed to the record results achieved in seagoing throughput in the Port of Hamburg. “The port cargo handling business as well as the transport companies have impressively demonstrated that even with temporarily critical situations it is possible to move large volumes of cargo into the hinterland. We can now already say that the fourth tube of the Elbe Tunnel, which is again in use has visibly relieved the traffic situation. The maintenance work necessary on the Köhlbrand bridge in the port is also making good progress and will be completed in October,” emphasized Axel Mattern. Jens Meier, Managing Director of Hamburg Port Authority, added: “Our excellent figures are at the same time a challenge for the tomorrow. Only together can we guarantee the traffic flows for the future and so sustainably remain on course”.

The Port of Hamburg Marketing Executive Board also states clearly that they will keep domestic and foreign port customers informed through the port representatives on particular challenges e.g. the still outstanding river channel adjustments of the lower and outer Elbe and the impact of construction work and temporary handling bottlenecks at the terminals. “Our Port customers are showing considerable understanding for this particular situation. It is clear to them that the traffic and handling situation in other large European container ports is also not free of traffic jams and other problems. We rely on speedy implementation and completion of Hamburg’s most important infrastructure projects and on the strong performance of the Port and transport industry in Hamburg and the region. Hamburg is Germany’s largest port and logistics location and takes on an exceptional function as a hub for global cargo flows for our economy and the exports of our neighbouring countries,” added Egloff.

Number of especially large containerships increasing further in Hamburg

The first six months were also marked by a volume increase in seaborne cargo of an unforeseeable amount, brought about by the continued growth in size of containerships. In the first half year of 2014 Hamburg received 244 ultra large containerships with slot capacities of 10,000 TEU and more. The number of ships in this large size class calling increased in a similar period of time by 27.1 percent and clearly shows that the river channel adjustment in the lower and outer Elbe must be urgently realized for the Port and shipping industry.

Double digit growth for container traffic with China, India, Africa and Poland

The Port of Hamburg has profited from stable German exports and a stronger demand in neighbouring European countries. As a north European hub over 1.4 million TEU (+ 12.9 percent) passed through Hamburg especially en route to China. Container traffic from Indian ports reaching Hamburg in the first half year achieved a result of 118,000 TEU (+ 13.2 percent). Container traffic with Africa was extraordinarily good in the first half year reaching 171,000 TEU, a plus of 33.3 percent. Of special importance for the Port of Hamburg are container volumes from and to the Baltic Sea region: 1.2 million TEU were transported in the first half year using feeder ships. That represents a plus of 4.5 percent. Container traffic handling with Polish ports reached 199,000 TEU (+ 33.5 percent). Container traffic between Hamburg and Russian ports reached 330,000 TEU in the first six months and so remains 3.8 percent under comparable results for the previous year. After China, Russia is the second most important trading partner for the Port of Hamburg in container traffic. With more than 160 feeder services weekly, of which 32 call at Russian ports, Hamburg is the central hub for the Baltic region in container traffic.

Record level of 145 million tons can be reached by the end of the year

“In 2014 we can reach a plus of four percent in sea cargo handling and in container handling a five percent increase, if everything goes according to plan,” forecasts Axel Mattern. This is on condition of further growth in container traffic with China and no increasing limitations on foreign trade with Russia because of sanctions. The result for the Port of Hamburg for the year 2014 a total turnover of approximately 145 million tons and a container throughput of about 9.7 million TEU would be possible. This would top the previous record achieved in 2008 of 140 million tons of sea cargo.

MSC Cruises to offer participation in the tenerife marathon

Tenerife resizedTravellers are invited to join the Grand Voyage of MSC Magnifica when she departs from the port of Hamburg, Germany, on 8 November 2014 for the faraway shores of Buenos Aires in Argentina on a 20-night cruise. A journey that will enchant MSC guests, with an onboard programme teeming with entertainment, delicious cuisine and exciting cultural features.

Upon leaving Germany, guests onboard MSC Magnifica will benefit from 12 relaxing days at sea as well as calls in eight diverse destinations. The ship will call in at Le Havre, in France, and Southampton, in the UK, gateways to Paris and London respectively. Her next port of call will be Lisbon, the beautiful capital city of Portugal, where travellers will be able to explore the much-loved streets of the city.

MSC Magnifica will then set sail for the Canary Islands, and Santa Cruz de Tenerife in particular before heading towards Brazil where she will call at Recife, Salvador de Bahia and Rio de Janeiro. Her final destination will be the harbour on the River Plate and Argentinean capital, Buenos Aires.

This Grand Voyage will also offer a unique opportunity to put on your running shoes and take part in the very first Tenerife Marathon on 16 November 2014, when MSC Magnifica calls in Santa Cruz de Tenerife. Three options are available at varying levels of difficulty. The 8km course offers an urban route and a perfect opportunity to see the city on the move, with the departure of the race just a stone’s throw from the ship. The second option is the half marathon, a 21km course around the town of Santa Cruz de Tenerife and along the coastal road overlooking the ocean. For the truly dedicated runners among MSC Magnifica guests is the full marathon, a 42km route that starts at the harbour of Santa Cruz, then cuts through the city centre before heading towards the coastal road. Application limit for participating is 25 October 2014.

And for those who choose not to run, Santa Cruz, which sits at the crossroads between Europe and Africa offers bustling markets, vibrant culture, mouthwatering seafood and breathtaking landscapes. A full programme of excursions will be available on the day, so that runners and non-runners alike can make the most of the island’s highlights, including day trips marked by great shopping and beach opportunities in buzzing tourist towns, and memorable encounters with nature at its best.

As the ship gently makes its way between its various enchanting ports of call, a very entertaining enrichment programme will be available to MSC guests. Lectures about the ports of destinations and related themes – Canary Islands, Rio de Janeiro, Salvador de Bahia, the great navigators in history, etc. – various arts and crafts workshops, light-hearted games and different classes (tai chi, dance, etc.). Our MSC chefs will also make guests’ mouths water with the finger-licking food served 20 hours a day on the ship, including a wide range of local delicacies according to the ports of call.

Following the race, MSC Magnifica will sail to the lush shores of South America, and Brazil. After a few days at sea, during which tired runners will be able to rest and recuperate , MSC travellers will discover the captivating landscapes and warm cultures of Brazil, from palm-fringed beaches, tropical islands and forests, to captivating metropolises with colourful neighbourhoods in one of the world’s most fascinating regions.

The final destination of the ship, Argentina, will be reached on 28 November, after 20 days at sea. Travellers will bask in the springtime warmth of Buenos Aires , birthplace of the Tango. Relish the sights of La Boca and San Telmo and savour the delicious fresh produce that defines Argentinean cuisine in the Palermo neighbourhood whilst taking in the bustling energy of the city.

An MSC Grand Voyage is truly a journey of a lifetime, where you can discover the world and amazing destinations from the comfort of an MSC Cruises ship, and in the knowledge that you will be looked after with the greatest of Mediterranean care.

200th shipset for Airbus A320 final assembly line loaded for China at HHLA Container Terminal Tollerort

6 years of successful development of logistics between Hamburg and Tianjin

The 200th shipset for Airbus’s A-320 final assembly line (FAL) in Tianjin, China, was loaded on to the containership COSCO Hope at HHLA’s Container Terminal Tollerort on 28 July and despatched onwards to Asia. Transport by sea to Tianjin lasts around 40 days.

Four ‘shipsets’ per month are transported by containership from the Port of Hamburg to Tianjin. The forward and rear fuselages, tailplane and rudder, the main landing gear doors and the inner landing flaps are each transported by a special transport craft from Airbus pier in Finkenwerder to HHLA Container Terminal Tollerort. The engine mounts (pylons) are delivered separately by truck to the terminal in the port. All the components are then loaded on to the containership on special sea transport frames. The wings are built in Tianjin itself and delivered there by Airbus’s partner XAC. The A320 final assembly line in Tianjin has been building A319 and A320 aircraft since 2008 and is currently completing these at a rate four per month. This was Airbus’s first final assembly line outside Europe. For over 6 years Airbus’s Hamburg base has functioned as logistic hub for A320 production activities outside Europe.

For Hamburger Hafen und Logistik (HHLA), handling project cargo at a container terminal is routine. Cargoes from the project logistics sector are shipped regularly from the largest Hamburg cargo-handling firm’s terminals. Dr. Thomas Koch, Managing Director of HHLA‘s Container Terminal Tollerort, says: “Loading of Airbus shipsets is of importance for Hamburg as an industrial base. We are delighted by the trust shown by our customer COSCO and Airbus in this spectacular transport. Even if a certain routine has set in after 200 shipments, each one of them represents a challenge that we are happy to tackle.”

The Port of Hamburg is an important handling hub for conventional general and project cargo. In 2013 Germany’s largest seaport loaded 1.9 million tons in this segment. Project cargo accounts for a large share of exports, especially. Industrial companies from Germany, Central and Eastern Europe shipped 503,000 tons in the same year from the universal port of Hamburg that is an important hub in Europe, not only for container traffic but also in the field of conventional general and project cargo.

Hamburg is one of Germany’s top three industrial centres. Firms of world renown such as Airbus, Aurubis, Beiersdorf, Unilever, Lufthansa Technik and Bode Chemie underpin and strengthen Hamburg’s reputation as an industrial location of worldwide significance. Hamburg is the central hub in Europe for trade with the People’s Republic of China. Container handling with China and Hong Kong constitutes around 29 percent of total container handling in the Port of Hamburg, reaching a volume of 2.7 million TEU (+ 2.9 percent) in 2013.

Port of Hamburg Marketing opens representative office in North Rhine-Westphalia

With the opening of a representative office in North-Rhine-Westphalia (NRW), the second most important region of the German market for Hamburg, the Port of Hamburg’s internationally active marketing organisation is making a point. From 18 July, Port of Hamburg Marketing’s Representative Office (West) will be located in Dortmunder Hafen AG’s head office. This on-the-spot presence will enable Port of Hamburg Marketing to cover the NRW region even more promptly and intensively. Heading the new representative office will be Volker Hahn, who has until now looked after the region from Hamburg.

At the opening of the new representative office, Volker Hahn together with the Port of Hamburg Executive Board Members Axel Mattern and Ingo Egloff thanked Uwe Büscher, Chairman of the Port of Dortmund, for its excellent cooperation and support. “With its proximity to the economically active regions of East Westphalia, Münsterland, South Westphalia, the Dortmund area and the rest of North Rhine-Westphalia, the new location of our port’s representative office in the headquarters of our member, the Port of Dortmund, represents the optimal choice,” said Axel Mattern, CEO of Port of Hamburg Marketing at the opening of the office. “Opening of a port representative office in NRW is the right move and a clear signal of the Port of Hamburg’s wish to reinforce and extend its presence in NRW. As Gateway to the World, Hamburg with its liner services offers importers and exporters in NRW the finest transport connections to all parts of the globe,” continued Mattern. Büscher added: “I am delighted about the Port of Hamburg’s Representative Office. This serves as a practical example of the desired intensification of cooperation between German seaports and inland ports.”

For Hamburg as Germany’s largest universal port, the state of North Rhine Westphalia with its industry being such a notable exporter is of immense importance on both the import and export sides. With around 500,000 TEU (20-ft standard containers), NRW ranks second after Bavaria for Hamburg’s container hinterland traffic.

For inbound and outbound rail traffic, Europe’s largest rail port offers rapid and high-performance transport links to and from NRW. “For NRW, Hamburg is a fine alternative to the competing ports situated farther west that rely mainly on truck and inland waterway craft transport. In addition, as part of our marketing and information work we champion transport solutions that wherever possible preferably shift container shipments from the roads to more environmentally friendly rail. For cargoes and heavy project shipments, where time is a less critical factor, this also increasingly applies to inland waterway shipping,” continued Axel Mattern.

Especially against the background of the new terminal for multimodal transport to be completed in Dortmund by the end of 2015 or the beginning of 2016, Port of Hamburg Marketing and the Port of Dortmund anticipate an increase of railborne cargo shipments between the ports of Hamburg and Dortmund. The new facility for multimodal traffic could also lead to an expansion of railborne traffic between the ports of Hamburg and Dortmund, HHM and the Port of Dortmund anticipate. An expansion of container train links between Dortmund and Hamburg will also mean that even more export and import cargo can move between NRW and Germany’s largest universal port without hitting traffic jams en route.

Contact:

Port of Hamburg Marketing – Representative Office (West)

Speicherstrasse 23

44147 Dortmund

Head of the Representative Office: Volker Hahn

Tel.: +49 231 9839 9695

E-mail: hahn@hafen-hamburg.de

The ZIM Hamburg reinforces Israel Express via Hamburg

Zim Hamburg am 7.7.2014 erstmals einkommend HamburgThe North Europe Service 1 (NE-1) run by shipowners ZIM Integrated Shipping Services and MSC Mediterranean Shipping Company is the most important liner service linking Hamburg weekly with Israel via the Mediterranean. Transport volumes have grown continuously since 2007, in all by around 21 percent. In 2013 around 62,000 TEU (20-ft standard containers) were transported on seaborne container services along this route.

ZIM had already extended and restructured the NE-1 service at the beginning of 2013 in reaction to rising quantities and market requirements. Being deployed for the first time in the liner service from July onwards, the ZIM Hamburg will provide greater transport capacities and a larger number of reefer container connections. The vessel is replacing a smaller one previously operating on this service. The ZIM Hamburg berthed for the first time at Eurogate Container Terminal Hamburg (CTH) on 7 July. From there she will regularly be making the round voyage to Antwerp, Le Havre, Ashdod, Alexandria, Haifa, Ashdod, Valencia, Felixstowe, Rotterdam and back again to Hamburg. The main cargoes shipped via Hamburg will be food and beverages, chemical products and machinery and equipment. From Israel come chemical products, food and beverages, and products of agriculture, forestry, hunting, forestry and fisheries.

The ZIM Hamburg has a slot capacity of 6,350 TEU, including 500 for reefer containers. The ship was built in Japan, being delivered in May, 2009, and is 293 m long, with a beam of 40m and a draft fully laden of 14m. “With the introduction of this new and larger ship we have adapted NE-1 to market requirements in respect of slot capacity and increased availability of reefer container connections. In addition, we are delighted to have a ship on this service that as the ZIM Hamburg bears the name not only of our shipping company, but also of what for us is the most important port in Northern Europe. That well expresses our alliance with Hamburg as a seaport,” stressed Norbert Trapp, Managing Director of ZIM Germany GmbH.

The company marked the introduction of the ZIM Hamburg on its North Europe Service 1 and her first call in Hamburg by inviting its business partners to an official reception on board. From the Hamburg side, Andreas Brummermann, Hamburg’s Deputy Port Captain, and Ingo Egloff, Executive Board Member of Port of Hamburg Marketing, were there to welcome the ship and her crew. As a token of friendship, Andreas Brummermann presented Valentin Deliu, the captain of the ZIM Hamburg, with the Port of Hamburg’s admiralty plaque.

 

Cruise Port Hamburg on the move

dsc_1505jNorwegian Cruise Line is sending its newest ship Norwegian Escape to Hamburg. TUI Cruises just christened its newest ship Mein Schiff 3 in Hamburg and last Friday, the Azamara Journey visited the port for the first time.

The latest news for the cruise port Hamburg is spectacular: The new vessel Norwegian Escape”will visit Hamburg on 23 October 2015 during its debut celebrations.

In October 2015 Norwegian Cruise Line will be celebrating a premiere in Hamburg: Its new vessel Norwegian Escape, visiting the city on 23 October 2015, will be the largest cruise ship to date to be welcomed in Hamburg. The new vessel will be making its public debut in the city – first during a 2-night cruise for the travel industry and, following this, a 2-night cruise for end consumers taking the ship from Hamburg to Southampton. The Freestyle Cruising resort, with a capacity for 4,200 passengers, is currently under construction at the Meyer Werft shipyard in Papenburg and will be the largest member of the line’s fleet when launched in autumn 2015.

“The European market has played an important role for Norwegian Cruise Line for years now, with Germany in particular one of our key source markets. Our choice of Hamburg as the venue for the Continental European premiere celebrations for a new vessel for the first time clearly illustrates our commitment to the German market, demonstrating the potential we see here for Norwegian Cruise Line in the coming years,” says Jürgen Stille, Director Business Development Continental Europe at Norwegian Cruise Line. “We await the maiden call of our spectacular new vessel in Hamburg with great excitement.”

“We look forward to welcoming Norwegian Cruise Line to Hamburg when the Norwegian Escape calls in autumn 2015 and will depart from here to her first cruise. Norwegian’s prize-winning Freestyle Cruising concept and the international mix of guests on board are of continuously increasing interest for the booming German market. The presentation of the new vessel on the River Elbe, the cruise industry’s red carpet, is the perfect choice of venue,” says Gerd Drossel, Managing Director of Hamburg Cruise Center.

Hamburg has just once more proven itself being the stage for cruise events. June 12, Germany’s most successful recording artist, Helene Fischer, officially christened the Mein Schiff 3 in Hamburg’s HafenCity district. The glamorous naming ceremony, held under the motto ‘Diamond meets pearl’, took place on the pier of the Hamburg Cruise Center and was attended by some 1,700 invited guests from politics, business and society as well as numerous spectators.

The highlight of the afternoon’s naming ceremony was the special appearance by Helene Fischer. The singer floated up to the ship on a giant, pearl-like balloon to smash the obligatory bottle of champagne on the ship’s bows for the actual christening ceremony, to the enthusiastic applause of the crowd. In the evening, the exclusive concert from Helene Fischer was visited by over ten thousand fans and was joined by the ship alongside the river Elbe.

Last Friday, June 13, the Azamara Journey, called the Port of Hamburg for the first time and was traditionally welcomed by water fountains and a singing Hanseatic choir at the terminal. On this occasion, the symbolic presentation of the Hamburg admiralty plaque to the captain of the ship Johannes Tysse was undertaken by harbour captain Jörg Pollmann and the ship’s agent Simone Maraschi from Sartori & Berger.

 

Allocation of funds for the widening of the Kiel Canal also boosts the Port of Hamburg’s competitiveness

bi1At the beginning of June the Budgetary Committee of the German Federal Parliament allocated EUR 265 million for the widening of the Eastern section of the Kiel Canal. In April, the committee had already approved EUR 485 million for construction of a fifth lock in Brunsbüttel.

To speed up the remaining planning and tendering for the widening, the first EUR 5 million should be released this year. The Parliament has committed itself to an additional EUR 260 million by 2019. In addition, 35 new posts for technical and legal staff in the Federal Waterways and Shipping Administration have been authorised.

Building permission for the 20km eastern section of the Kiel Canal has been available since March 2014. In this section the canal should be widened from 44 to 70m by the end of this year.

“The overhaul of the Kiel Canal is not just a matter of survival for our colleagues in the ports of Brunsbüttel, Hochdonn, Hohenhörn, Rendsburg and Kiel situated directly on the canal. Its expansion is also of immense importance for the development and competitiveness of the entire German economy and industry – and hence also for the Port of Hamburg. We are therefore especially delighted about the good news from the Lower House,” stressed Axel Mattern, Executive Board Member of Port of Hamburg Marketing. More than 130 feeder links per week use the Kiel Canal as the fastest and most ecological sea connection between Hamburg and the Baltic region. Last year around 2 million TEU were transported on this route. “The advantage of the canal is immense. Between Hamburg and Gdansk, feederships save half the distance if they take the short cut through the canal and do not sail around Skagen in Denmark,” added Mattern. In 2013 a total of 31,097 vessels with 94.8 million tons of cargo passed through the Kiel Canal.

Frigo Coldstore Logistics opens a third cold store in the Port of Hamburg

NaamloosWith an inauguration ceremony Frigo Coldstore Logistics opened a third cold store in the Port of Hamburg on 13 May 2014. When the building is completed in August 2014 the company will offer a total cool capacity of 40,000 pallet positions on 18,000m2. The extension was necessary due to the continuous increase in customer demand for deep freeze capacity. The storage extension will also provide extra office space and 12 new jobs at Frigo, the number of staff at present is 38 including four vocational trainees and will probably rise to 50.

In 2005 Frigo began business in their present location in Altenwerder, Hamburg with a completely new deep freeze storage concept in two temperature zones and the accompanying office building. Already in 2008 they had to increase capacity. From the very beginning great value was put on implementing as high as possible energy efficiency and utilising all cutting-edge alternatives to save energy, from insulation to cooling technology. Part of the electricity is generated by their own solar arrays on the warehouse roof, which will possibly in future be used directly in the cold storage system. In the new third building phase the benchmark for an especially energy efficient building should be undercut once again by 20 percent; using intelligent LED lighting activated on demand by a motion control system and especially efficient space-saving concept facilitating stacking up to eight levels.

The incoming deep-frozen food will be handled on 20 loading ramps, later there will be 30. The ramps are cooled to five degrees guaranteeing a continuous cold chain. The new building will increase the picking area facilitating optimal compilation of goods for customer orders.

Background information:

For many years the per capita consumption of frozen food has risen continuously and with it the challenge to provide enough storage space. The Port of Hamburg figures underline this trend clearly. 618,000 TEU refrigerated containers were handled there in 2013. This represents 6.74 million tons, a growth of 15.2 percent on the previous year. 3.26 million tons of this were imports. The major countries of origin being the Far-East, the east and west coast of South America, the rest of Asia, the South Seas and Indonesia as well as Norway.

The foodstuffs imported by Frigo customers come into the Port of Hamburg from all over the world, and are transferred directly into cold storage, e.g. meat from South America, fish from Canada and vegetables from China. The storage temperature for most of the foodstuffs is minus 18 degrees centigrade. Customers from the whole of Europe can call up their goods on demand and they will be delivered for further processing or to the retailer by refrigeratedtrucks.

The current deepfreeze storage capacity at Frigo is around 15,000 tons. That represents approximately 75 million ready-made meals.

High-volume and heavy-load shipments

The operational parameters for the high-volume and heavy goods shipments into the Port of Hamburg, generating such significant added value, are in need of sustained improvement through efficient infrastructure and lean authorization procedures. Such is the call from the Hamburg Chamber of Commerce, der Unternehmensverband Hafen Hamburg (UVHH), Port of Hamburg Marketing (HHM) and der Verband Straßengüterverkehr und Logistik Hamburg (VSH). “Three out of four machines manufactured in Germany go for export, and it is therefore essential to secure the access to main traffic routes and overseas ports,” stated Fritz Horst Melsheimer, President of the Chamber of Commerce.

gastank-transp-hh_6809-02VSH chairman Thomas Usinger appealed to the authorities to devote more attention to the load capacity of roads and bridges: “If we are to be capable of acting immediately, timely shipments necessitate the regular conduct at short intervals of static calculations regarding loads transported. Otherwise we shall face a situation as with Argentinienbrücke on the main route through the port.” Static calculations of have shown that the bridge is no longer up to handling today’s loads, so that restrictions affecting heavy goods traffic have had to be imposed.

The universal port of Hamburg with its multipurpose terminals is of great importance for the transhipment of conventional general cargoes, emphasised the four commercial bodies. In the Metropolitan Region around 18,000 jobs depend on this segment. Transport of oversize and especially heavy loads is constantly becoming more difficult on account of the limited load capacity of many bridges. Chamber President Melsheimer continued: “Since these cargoes – machine and plant elements, for instance – are of immense importance for the Port Hamburg, any restrictions on bridge structures make a direct impact on port throughput.” Should no sustained improvement in the situation occur, warned Melsheimer, there was a risk that the project cargo of such importance for Hamburg would in future be loaded at competing ports. The UVHH also therefore appealed to central government and the federal states to put these bridges that are so vital for cargo transport in order as rapidly as possible.

UVHH, HHM, VSH and the Chamber of Commerce have joined representatives of the Hamburg administration in setting up a “Round Table” covering the transport of high-volume and heavy cargoes. This is designed to promote a regular exchange of experience and to lead to improvements. Business representatives had beforehand submitted an account of the situation and recommendations for action.